And so, the final installment! In this blog I’m going to run through the design of the second half of my Rube Goldberg Machine and then finally present the video showing it in action. So back to where I left off…

Step 7

Using the last value we calculated as 0.36 N for the force generated by the cardboard weight on the wheel, it was clear that this force was far too small to trigger any sort of subsequent reaction, hence I bumped up the amount of cardboard on the weight by another 200 grams to get 0.3 kg, resulting in an…


So, to clear up the first thing you’re probably wondering about, I should probably give a brief overview as to what exactly a Rube Goldberg Machine actually is? Well, you’ve probably seen one before without knowing what it is called, essentially it is a chain of mechanical reactions designed to perform a task (such as putting a ball in a bucket) in the least efficient way possible. And generally, the result ends up looking pretty cool.

There are some especially impressive Rube Goldberg Machines that you can find online, which must have taken months to build (and a lot of…


Finally, we’ve reached the climax of Assignment 2: The Obstacle Course. As discussed in previous posts the goal here is to write code for the robot which will allow it to navigate an obstacle course (shown below), and then catch a few ping-pong balls at the end before exiting the course.

Coding

So the first task here was to write the code. Some good news here was that we could add a stabiliser wheel for the robot which meant we could skip any necessary balancing code. …


It’s been a long time coming but I have finally come round to writing a blog post on the design of my Ping-Pong Ball Launcher for the upcoming obstacle course challenge. The design problem that was assigned is:

A device is needed to project a ping-pong ball (or multiple balls) into a stationary container.

A few added restrictions for this assignment include:

  • The launcher must store the required potential energy to launch the ping-pong ball.
  • The launcher must have an automated reloading system (i.e. you can’t use your hands).
  • The ping pong ball must clear an obstacle, therefore requiring the…

So the robots have finally arrived and I’ve been busy assembling mine and testing it out for the obstacle course challenge ahead! The assembly was a simple task and reminded me of my Lego days, but to ensure I outline the full process I took to complete this assignment, I’m going to split this post into two parts: Assembly and Testing. Feel free to skip to the Testing section if you’re familiar with mini mechatronic projects like this.

Assembly

Before the build…

Definitely some Christmas vibes on the packaging of this Tumbller robot. …


Hello, so this week I split my time between designing the mechanical attachment for the robot and putting in some final touches on my Tumbler model in SolidWorks. The quality of the SolidWorks models my classmates have been working on are of an extremely high quality, so I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t comparing my own to a few of theirs. So, in an attempt to hold my own, I’ve been adding in a few tweaks and improvements before the deadline. Some of the said improvements include adding a tire thread to the wheels, and also working a…


Hi again, I had to skip last week’s blog post as I had other assignments and work to catch up on. However, in the last week or so I’ve managed to make considerable progress with this project. A few check boxes I have recently ticked off include completing the design of all the individual components for the Tumbler, putting together the corresponding SolidWorks assembly and I also had time to build a few prototype home-made ping-pong launchers which I’ll be using to fire a few balls into a container on top of the robot. …


Hello again, since starting work on my Elegoo Tumbller Robot last week (which you can read about here) I’ve made good progress on the SolidWorks model. After writing the first post, I continued to draw up the initial designs for the rest of the individual components. As expected, some parts ended up being way out of proportion and I also had to make some quick fixes to my list of dimensions along the way. Thankfully, the overall shape of the robot is looking a lot better compared to earlier in the week. …


Hi, I’m Conor, I’m a 3rd year Mechanical Engineering with Management Student in Trinity College Dublin and this is a first attempt at documenting some of the work I have undertaken during my studies.

So, the main reason for this account is to demonstrate the progress being made on a ‘Tumbler Robot’ which we have been tasked with building as part of this year’s Design module — more on that in a moment. The other reason is to share any other progress, interests and/or engineering related hobbies that I am working on over the next few months and beyond. I…

Conor Kennedy

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